Mar 23 2011

Blown to Bits: China’s War in Cyberspace August-September 2020

Published by under Uncategorized

Fictional account of cyberwarfare between the US and China in the year 2020 written by:

Dr. Christopher Bronk is the Baker Institute fellow in information and technology policy and a lecturer in computer science at Rice University; served as a career diplomat with the US State Department; doctorate from the Maxwell School of Syracuse University; and studied international relations at Oxford University.

Read:  Dr. Bronk’s paper Blown to Bits published by Stragetic Quarterly

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Mar 23 2011

Thinking like a Chinese hacker 101: Panic is your friend

Published by under Cyber Crime,Evil and/or Stupid

Think the Google vs. China gmail debate made the top 10 list in China?  Nope, according to Baidu’s weekly focus, the aftermath of the “Salt Panic”  was on everyone’s mind.  This was due to the mistaken belief that the iodine content in salt could help with the effects of radiation poisoning.  Prior to that, Chinese citizens had been searching online to purchase salt.  Chinese hackers monitor popular web searches and left a slew of malicious web pages to help balance the supply and demand ratio.

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Mar 14 2011

Chinese government websites getting trashed

Published by under PRC attacks

People’s Daily reports that 4,635 Chinese government websites were hacked in 2010, a jump of 68 percent from 2008.  That has to be close to all of them, right?         

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Mar 11 2011

US #1 perp attacking China’s classifed networks

Published by under Cyber Crime,PRC attacks

Quick Translation:

Rising’s report on China’s 2010 Corporate Security Threats  indicates that government, military, and academic research institutes were significant targets for hackers. 

The report further shows that among all hacker attacks, there were a significantly higher number carried out on institutions dealing with state secrets and financial security such as:  national agencies, classified units (dealing with classified/confidential  information), research institutions, and financial organizations.  Some units dealing with classified information suffered nearly a thousand different attacks a month.

Hackers often used the personal computers, cell phones, and thumb drives of individuals working in classified units as portals for attack.  For example, the personal computers of academic researchers involved in military projects were often the targets of attack.  Attackers attempted to use thumb drives, moveable hard disks, and cell phones as springboards for attacks on classified networks.  If successful, the leak of classified information could have grave consequences. 

According to Rising’s estimates, in 2010 alone, there were in excess of 10 million attacks on classified networks.  Of those, 90% of the attacking IPs came from abroad with the US, Japan, and South Korea ranking as the three highest ranking sources of attack.

Rising’s report on China’s 2010 Corporate Security Threats indicates that government, military, and academic research institutes were significant targets for hackers. 

The report further showed that among all hacker attacks, there was a significantly higher number carried out on institutions dealing with state secrets and financial security such as:  national agencies, classified units (dealing with classified/confidential  information), research institutions, and financial organizations.  Some units dealing with classified information suffered nearly a thousand different attacks a month.

Hackers often used the personal computers, cell phones, and thumb drives of individuals working in classified units as portals for attack.  For example, the personal computers of academic researchers involved in military projects were often the targets of attack.  Attackers attempted to use thumb drives, moveable hard disks, and cell phones as springboards for attacks on classified networks.  If successful, the leak of classified information could have grave consequences. 

According to Rising’s estimates, in 2010 alone, there were in excess of 10 million attacks on classified networks.  Of those, 90% of the attacking IPs came from abroad with the US, Japan, and South Korea ranking as the three highest ranking sources of attack.

IP source attacks on China’s classified networks:

US 21%

Japan 17%

South Korea 17%

Singapore 11%

India 8%

Europe 6%

Hong Kong/Taiwan and others 20%

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Mar 11 2011

Chinese hackers messing with my Droid

Published by under Uncategorized

Fine, shut down the NYC power grid but leave my phone alone.  My addiction for downloading every app available has come back to haunt me:

From TechEye:

“Insecurity outfit Symantec has warned about suspicious code which is under the bonnet of a repackaged security tool Google released last weekend.

The dodgy code appears in the Chinese version of the security tool which remotely cleans malicious apps off Android phones.

Symantec found the “trojanised” package on an unregulated third-party Chinese marketplace.”

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Mar 10 2011

China: Hacking, its not just for export anymore…

Published by under Uncategorized

From Bloomberg:

“China said computer hacking attacks against websites of the nation’s government agencies jumped 68 percent last year, and called on local regulators to follow the U.S. and the European Union in stepping up Internet policing.

More than 4,600 Chinese government websites had their content modified by hackers in 2010, according to a report by the National Computer Network Emergency Response Technical Team/Coordination Center of China yesterday. Stricter penalties should be imposed against offenders to deter cyber attacks, according to the center, which is affiliated to the Ministry of Industry and Information Technology.”

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Mar 09 2011

DDOS attack on WordPress Came from China

Published by under Uncategorized

From PCWorld:

The large distributed denial of service (DDoS) attacks that hit the WordPress.com blog publishing platform last week originated from China, according to the founder of the site.

A DDOS attack involves harnessing hundreds or thousands of computers to simultaneously bombard a web site with data so it becomes overwhelmed. The computers in such attacks have typically been infected with malware so they can be used without the consent and awareness of their owners.

The attacks, which brought slowdowns to the WordPress.com site, were severe enough to interfere with the company’s three data centers in Chicago, San Antonio and Dallas. The site has since returned to normal as of Monday.

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Mar 09 2011

McAfee PDF on “Night Dragon”

Link to McAfee’s PDF white paper Global Energy Cyberattacks: “Night Dragon” that primarily originated in China.

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Mar 09 2011

Zhenker…why?

Published by under Evil and/or Stupid

In January of 2010, a group calling themselves the “Iranian Cyber Army” attacked Baidu.  Chinese netizens thought the attack might be in retaliation for Chinese twitter users support of Iranian reformists.  Not sure I get the connection with Baidu, but there you have the background.

Running through some videos on Tudou (China Youtube) and came across the defacement of the Iranian government website seen above.  The hacker, going by the name Zhenker, wants us to know the address of the defacement:

 

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Mar 09 2011

Glass is half full Chinese cyber attack on the French

Published by under Other attacks

Hey,  if you are going to be the victim of a Chinese cyber attack, it might as well be “spectacular.” 

From Fox News:

The French government said Monday that it was the victim of a “spectacular” cyber attack from hackers using Internet addresses in China who targeted documents on international economic affairs.

The hackers were hunting for documents relating to the Group of 20 (G-20) developed and developing nations, which this year is led by France, said Budget Minister Francois Baroin, adding that a probe was underway into the attacks, AFP reported.

Read more here

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